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5 edition of Technology transfer from federal laboratories and universities found in the catalog.

Technology transfer from federal laboratories and universities

United States

Technology transfer from federal laboratories and universities

Report

by United States

  • 287 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages16
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7368525M
ISBN 100160389704
ISBN 109780160389702

TechLink, Montana State University. TechLink is the Department of Defense’s primary national technology transfer partner. Our unmatched technology licensing expertise is grounded in over 20 years of partnership with DoD laboratories; whereby more than 1, inventions have been transferred to industry partners so meaningful products and services can be realized. According to the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), it is “the formal transfer of new discoveries and innovations resulting from scientific research conducted at universities and nonprofit research institutions to the commercial sector for public benefit” (Crowell ).Cited by: 1.

Technology transfer, also known as tech transfer or technology commercialization, is the process by which valuable research, skills, knowledge, and/or technology is delivered from government, colleges and universities, or other research institutions into the corporate environment where it can be nurtured and developed into a commercial product or service with wider application and distribution.   The Evolution of University Technology Transfer: By the Numbers otherwise known as technology transfer (TT). Including federal laboratories, the US .

Acceptance of federal research funding obligates the recipient institution to: 1) obtain written agreements from employees to report inventions and discoveries and assign them to the institution; 2) disclose inventions to the federal agency supporting the grant; 3) elect title (if they are going to) to the invention within 2 years; and 4) file a patent application within 1 year of election of Cited by: 3.   Technology transfer has made available discoveries such as cancer drugs, recombinant DNA, imaging diagnostics and nanotechnology — in the Cited by: 4.


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Technology transfer from federal laboratories and universities by United States Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is an indispensable resource for those who want access to the latest breakthrough technologies, most of which can be traced to universities and federally funded laboratories. These taxpayer-funded idea factories can and should be leveraged by companies for competitive advantage.2/5(1).

Federal Technology Transfer Legislation and Policy (The Green Book) Federal Technology Transfer Legislation and Policy, more commonly known as “The Green Book,” provides the principal statutory and executive branch policies that constitute the framework of the federal technology transfer program.

Get this from a library. Technology transfer from federal laboratories and universities: report. [United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Subcommittee on Technology and Competitiveness.].

Executive SummaryThe purpose of this report is to present a series of analyses of technology transfer activities across federal agencies and their research support of efforts to transfer technology from federal agencies to private and public organizations has long had bipartisan support from both Congress and the White : Albert N.

Link, Zack Oliver, Gretchen Jordan, Christopher S. Hayter. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, is thenationâ s primary federal laboratory for renewable energy research. It focuses onalternative fuels, analytic studies, basic sciences, buildings and energy systems,industrial technologies, photovoltaics, and wind technology.

systematic study of technology transfer at federal laboratories published since the early s. This study covers a larger number of diverse laboratories than the previous studies. Since the passage of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act offederal laboratories have adopted many innovative strategies to transfer technology to the.

the technology transfer function in twelve United States universities. Using the insights gained from this survey we then proceed to a statistical analysis of AUTM data. 13 rows  Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Summary Reports to The President and The.

throughout university technology transfer programs. This report will be part of a collaborative effort by the PTO and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in support of NIST’s larger and presidentially mandated report on technology transfer activities in federal laboratories.

Access laboratory resources and form valuable connections with our FREE and easy-to-use T2 tools. FLC Business Find federal laboratories, cutting-edge facilities and equipment, funding opportunities, and other accessible resources to help grow your business.

This book is an indispensable resource for those who want access to the latest breakthrough technologies, most of which can be traced to universities and federally funded laboratories.

These taxpayer-funded idea factories can and should be leveraged by companies for competitive by: 4. Abstract. Why should a federal laboratory worry about how to improve technology transfer. Primarily because there is a widespread perception in industry and government that the U.S. is not realizing an adequate return from its substantial investment in the federal laboratory by: National (or government) laboratories are required by federal law to engage in technology transfer to state and local governments and the private sector.

15 U.S.C. § (a). This article is intended for lawyers advising private companies that are contemplating technology transfer deals with institutions or university personnel.

– Requires federal laboratories to have a formal tec hnology transfer program and actively seek opportunities to transfer technology to industry, universities, and state and local governments Federal Technology Transfer Act of (FTTA) Makes tech transfer a responsibility of every federal laboratory scientist and engineerFile Size: KB.

The Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was enacted by Congress in and builds on the Stevenson-Wydler Act of FTTA improves access to federal laboratories by non-federal organizations. It allows government inventors to patent their technologies and receive a share of the royalties when patents are licensed.

Tech Transfer Central has partnered with Jason Stolworthy, JD, Director of Technology Deployment with the Idaho National Laboratory, to bring you this insightful webinar: Working with Federal Laboratories: Best Practices for University-Based Technology Transfer and Licensing Professionals, scheduled for March We’ll focus on the.

Part II: Technology Transfer in the United States: Introduction: The R&D Enterprise: Technology Transfer from Higher Education to Industry: U.S. Federal Laboratories and Technology Transfer to Industry: Technology Transfer by Privately Held, Nonacademic Organizations: Annex II: Case Studies in.

– Requires federal laboratories to have a formal tech nology transfer program and actively seek opportunities to transfer technology to industry, universities, and state and local governments Federal Technology Transfer Act of (FTTA) Makes tech transfer a responsibility of every federal laboratory scientist and engineer.

Expansion of federal laboratory roles and university role in technology transfer and cooperative research and other technology-based economic development programs. Theoretical roots: Neo-classical economics: Traditional liberal governance with broad definition of government role.

Industrial policy theory, regional economic development by: At virtually every research university in America, the school itself manages tech transfer. While researchers are listed as inventors and are entitled to a cut of royalties, the university.

Working with Federal Laboratories: Best Practices for University-Based Technology Transfer and Licensing Professionals. The U.S. has 17 National Laboratories that conduct a significant amount of research and development projects with universities.

Each laboratory has its own technology transfer office and each project must operate under specific agreement types and terms — some of which are negotiable and some that are set in stone due to federal regulations.The United States Federal Technology Transfer Act of (P.L.

) was, after the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act ofthe second major piece of legislation focused on technology transfer from federal government agencies to the commercial sector. The act established the Federal Laboratory Consortium and enabled federal laboratories to enter into Cooperative Research and Enacted by: the 99th United States Congress.

The theme of this collection of essays is technology transfer. The topic has three major aspects: the interchange of technologies between military and civilian applications - spin-off, dual use, conversion and diversification fall under this heading; the proliferation of military arms, which could occur either through arms races between developed nations or through the transfer of military.